Rejoice – Ben & Jerry’s vegan ice cream

  • Lane
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  • Thursday, February 4, 2016
  • chunky-monkey-pint-kosher






    The time has come. Ben & Jerry the company with the cow on its logo, has given the cow the day off and is making vegan ice cream. Sure, we vegans have had many reasonable options for non dairy ice creams for years. My personal favorite is So Delicious, but now Ben & Jerry joins […]

    The time has come. Ben & Jerry the company with the cow on its logo, has given the cow the day off and is making vegan ice cream. Sure, we vegans have had many reasonable options for non dairy ice creams for years. My personal favorite is So Delicious, but now Ben & Jerry joins the mix.

    They have four vegan flavors including Chunky Monkey. Here's a link to find out where you can pick up a pint. Unfortunately, it doesn't seem to be available in LA yet...

     

     

    As a public service, here's a link to an article which discusses why we all can't lose weight. This has nothing to do with the potentiality of Ben & Jerry's vegan ice cream entering my home in the near future.

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    Vegan Thanksgiving Turkey 2015

  • Lane
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  • Tuesday, November 17, 2015
  • gardein






    It’s that time of the year again… Jane and I are sitting down to plan our Thanksgiving menu. If this is your first Thanksgiving as a vegan, or if you would like to bring something to the table that the omnivores in your life might consider a reasonable alternative to the ubiquitous turkey, I would […]

    It's that time of the year again... Jane and I are sitting down to plan our Thanksgiving menu.

    Tofurky_feastIf this is your first Thanksgiving as a vegan, or if you would like to bring something to the table that the omnivores in your life might consider a reasonable alternative to the ubiquitous turkey, I would strongly suggest avoiding Tofurky. While we have eaten our fair share of Tofurky at Thanksgiving, and have been happy to have it, in our opinion, there are considerably better options available today.

    The two best turkey alternatives (again, in our opinion) are Gardein's Holiday Roast and Trader Joe's Breaded Turkey-less Stuffed Roast with Gravy. In both looks and taste both are very similar, with the exception of the gravy. Gardein's gravy has more obvious overtones of sage and is a lighter brown than the TJs version.

    gardein

    Last week Jane prepared both roasts so we could taste them simultaneously. Jane felt they were both equally good, while I thought the Gardein was slightly better, but I wouldn't be able to tell the difference if I didn't have them both on my plate at the same time.

    trader joes holiday roastSo, for us, the fact that the TJs roast is $10, versus $15 for the Gardein roast, and we can get 3 TJs for the price of 2 Gardein's means that we will be stocking up on the TJs roast. Stocking up? you ask... yes I chose those words carefully. Trader Joe's only gets in a limited supply of their Turkey-less roasts, and they often run out of their holiday products before the end of the season.

    Nutritional info can be found here:

    http://gardein.com/products/holiday-roast/

    http://www.traderjoes.com/images/fearless-flyer/uploads/article-1951/NF50144-turkeyless-roast.pdf

    Note that Trader Joe's considers their 40 oz. roast enough for 6 servings, while Gardein thinks their 40 oz. roast should serve 8.

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    Vegan Shoes – Wills London

  • Lane
  • 1 Comment
  • Monday, October 26, 2015
  • vegan shoes






    Vegan shoes…  let’s face it, it’s tough to find high quality shoes that are comfortable, well made, and most importantly for those who are trying to eschew the use of animal products, aren’t made of leather. Living in the Los Angeles area, finding vegan restaurants (or just finding vegan options at other restaurants) has gotten […]

    Vegan shoes...  let's face it, it's tough to find high quality shoes that are comfortable, well made, and most importantly for those who are trying to eschew the use of animal products, aren't made of leather.

    Living in the Los Angeles area, finding vegan restaurants (or just finding vegan options at other restaurants) has gotten much easier over the years. The same can't be said for vegan footwear, at least in my experience; every time I looked for a pair of shoes that I liked they were either made of leather or were made cheaply or were uncomfortable.

    A while back I learned about Wills London, an online shoe store that only sells "vegan shoes". The nice folks at Wills London contacted us and offered to send me a pair of shoes free of charge to try out. I indicated that Vegan Bits provides its readers with honest reviews of products that we consider, as such, there would be a possibility that the review would not be favorable. The company's president, Will, was quite confident that I would be happy with their product. He said:

    The ethos of Wills is to produce vegan, ethical fashion that is high quality and affordable. My dream is to bridge the gap between everyday people and ethically produced vegan shoes. We focus on making a quality product and think you will agree when you try your brogues out. Saying that – you are very welcome to write whatever you think is reasonable about them.

    I looked at their website and found a pair that I liked, but before ordering them, I noticed that there was a negative review indicating that the soles were not made well. I mentioned to Will that my main concern was quality, especially the soles. He wrote:

    Just so you know – that review was referring to an older style of this shoe with an EVA grey sole (not the harder wearing welted version we have been using for about 9 months). You will find the sole you have will last you a LONG time – don’t just take my word for it of course and wear test them yourself. I have a pair and speak from my own experience as well as what my customers feedback.

    I ordered the Continental Brogues. They were shipped from Europe to the USA free of charge via DHL. They arrived just a few days after I placed the order. I delayed writing this review for a while so that I could wear them for a while and see how they felt and check on the wear-and-tear give before giving them a fair assessment.

    vegan shoes

    I am thrilled to write that I am very happy with their shoes. I feel that they are stylish, comfortable and have shown no signs of wear. As such, I would happily recommend Wills London to anyone seeking "vegan shoes".

    Wills has a large, growing variety of stylish vegan shoes for both men and women. It's great to find a shoe store that not only do they carry vegan shoes, but one that only sells vegan shoes, so there's no worry about liking a pair of shoes only to find that they are made of leather.

    It's wonderful that they ship their shoes to the USA free of charge. And, if you are dissatisfied with the shoes, they will take them back, with free return shipping as well!

    My only issue is price, the shoes aren't cheap; they aren't terribly expensive, but they're a bit more than I'm used to paying for shoes. But you get what you pay for; if you want cheaper shoes, you can buy shoes that are inferior. Wills London provides quality vegan shoes. If paying a little bit more for shoes is necessary in order to get high quality, comfortable, and vegan shoes, then that's what I'll be doing in the future.

    UPDATE: just before I published this article, I noticed that the prices seem to have come down since I received my pair. The shoes that I received are now selling for $117. That's very reasonable! So that removes price as a concern of mine, I will DEFINITELY be doing my future shoe shopping a Wills!

    If you are interested in seeing what Wills London has to offer, here's a link: http://wills-vegan-shoes.com/

    You can check them out on FaceBook as well: https://www.facebook.com/willsveganshoes

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    What do I eat more than anything? You might think I’m nuts

  • Lane
  • 1 Comment
  • Saturday, October 24, 2015
  • almonds






    What food do I eat more than any other? I’m not one of those people who tracks each and every morsel that I consume, so I really don’t know for sure that I eat the most. Vegans can’t be as oblivious as omnivores when it comes to nutrition; we need to make sure that we’re […]

    What food do I eat more than any other? I'm not one of those people who tracks each and every morsel that I consume, so I really don't know for sure that I eat the most. Vegans can't be as oblivious as omnivores when it comes to nutrition; we need to make sure that we're getting adequate protein. Nuts are an excellent  source of protein and a staple in our diet.

    Nuts, especially almonds, make up a large part of my daily intake. I eat almonds all day; for breakfast I have a shake consisting of almond milk -- from my soy milk-maker -- and almond butter, along with several other ingredients. As a midday snack or for dessert I often have an apple and a spoonful of almond butter. When I'm hungry and I can't think what to eat, I'll reach for a handful. (By the way, if you've never tasted almond butter, especially if you like peanut butter, you  should definitely give almond butter a try. It is incredible; granted it does cost twice as much as peanut butter, sometimes more, depending on where you shop. I might suggest checking out Costco or Trader Joe's.)

    Eating nuts as part of a healthy diet can be good for your heart. Nuts, which contain unsaturated fatty acids and other nutrients, are a great snack food, too. They're inexpensive, easy to store and easy to pack when you're on the go.

    The type of nut you eat isn't that important, although some nuts have more heart-healthy nutrients and fats than do others. Walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts — you name it — almost every type of nut has a lot of nutrition packed into a tiny package. If you have heart disease, eating nuts instead of a less healthy snack can help you more easily follow a heart-healthy diet.

    Can eating nuts help your heart?
    People who eat nuts as part of a heart-healthy diet can lower the low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol level in their blood. High LDL is one of the primary causes of heart disease.

    Eating nuts may reduce your risk of developing blood clots that can cause a fatal heart attack. Nuts also appear to improve the health of the lining of your arteries.

    almondsA great source of nutrition
    Almonds are an excellent source of vitamin E, magnesium and manganese, and a good source of fiber, copper, phosphorous and riboflavin. A one-ounce serving has 13 grams of “good” unsaturated fats, just 1 gram of saturated fat and is always cholesterol free. When compared ounce for ounce, almonds are the tree nut highest in protein, fiber, calcium, vitamin E, riboflavin and niacin.

    Heart Health
    According to the FDA via SF Gate, eating 1.5 ounces a day of most nuts, like almonds, may reduce the risk of heart disease. Many of the nutrients in almonds help contribute to increased heart health. For one, almonds are rich in magnesium, which is critical in preventing heart attacks and hypertension. Several clinical studies have also shown almonds can be effective in reducing bad cholesterol and preserving healthy cholesterol, which plays a major role in heart health.

    Good news on fat
    Yes, I know, many of you think that almonds, and all nuts, are fat laden and should be consumed sparingly. A 2012 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that a one-ounce serving of almonds (about 23 nuts) has just 129 calories as opposed to the previous count of 160. That's a 20% decrease. I'm, not a calorie counter, but if you are eating about 2000 calories, 20, 30, or even 40 nuts a day would account for less than 20% of your daily caloric intake.

    Vegans need to make sure they get adequate protein. I eat lots of almonds in various forms: raw, salted, as almond milk, as almond butter, slivered on salads, etc. Everyone, especially vegans should eat lots of almonds. A word of warning: Ignore all stories suggesting that almonds are not vegan, unless they are covered in milk chocolate.

    Now it's your turn
    How do you eat almonds? Do you have any recipes with almonds that you'd like to share?

     

     

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    Seattle Landlord offers discount to Vegans

  • Lane
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  • Wednesday, October 14, 2015
  • vegan seattle






    If you live in the Seattle area and are looking for an apartment, one landlord is offering a $200 per month discount on your rent if you claim to be a vegan or a vegetarian. Here are the specifics from an article from the Seattle area NBC affiliate   A landlord in Bothell is devoting […]

    If you live in the Seattle area and are looking for an apartment, one landlord is offering a $200 per month discount on your rent if you claim to be a vegan or a vegetarian.

    Here are the specifics from an article from the Seattle area NBC affiliate

     

    A landlord in Bothell is devoting his rental property to what he calls environmental activism. He's offering a discount based solely on what his tenants eat.

    "This is a three bedroom luxury townhome with an excellent backyard," Jinesh Varia said.

    Varia and his wife decided to move after the 9-month-old started crawling. He's already has about 15 showings in a couple weeks.

    However, if tenants think the spacious rooms, jacuzzi tub, modern kitchen, fireplace and nearby park are all the place has to offer, they're not reading the fine print.

    "Ethically and morally, it's extremely important to be vegetarian," Varia said.

    Varia and his family are members of the Vegetarians of Washington, and they want to encourage future tenants to do the same. So, they've decided to offer a $200 discount for vegetarians or vegans.

    "I really believe, just like the no smoking policy that all landlords have today, that we can promote this as a way to spread awareness," Varia said. "See if I can create a trend."

    Varia plans to use the honor code, and won't spy or check trash.

    For more information, visit: https://postlets.com/r/913-225th-pl-se-bothell-wa-98021/14952570

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    Kickstarter: Prepping Vegan Mashup Season 3 for Winter 2016

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  • 2a4783bd74db95e74185e0f61c0824d4_original






    better late than never… this is expiring very soon. check it out Community is incredibly important to us at Misen. We believe that good friends are what turn food into a meal, and we’ve got some great friends working on an ambitious Kickstarter project that needs your help. Vegan Mashup is a publicly aired TV […]

    Readying a new season of Delicious TV's Vegan Mashup – indie cooking series that airs on U.S. public television and parts of Canada

    better late than never... this is expiring very soon. check it out

    Community is incredibly important to us at Misen. We believe that good friends are what turn food into a meal, and we've got some great friends working on an ambitious Kickstarter project that needs your help.

    Vegan Mashup is a publicly aired TV show featuring "a pantry full" of talented vegan chefs hoping to raise money for their third season. They've got just a few hours to go on their campaign, they're close, and they could really use a turbo charge to help power through to their goal.

    Please join us in supporting them by sharing this link, and helping to build this community with us.

    Delicious TV’s Vegan Mashup is a cooking show for everyone. But it’s more than a cooking show. It's a new way to learn about food. And there is nothing like it on public television. We’ve made 2 seasons, a total of 12 episodes that have already aired over 17,000 times on public television in 45 U.S. states. We are working on Season 3 to begin airing on public television stations January 2016. We need finishing funds for color correction, closed captioning, HD television masters, satellite feeds, and “Hey hey, we’re back with new episodes” promo postcards.

     And a video from the producer.

    Why is it so awesome?

    On set with Toni Fiore, guest Elizabeth Fraser and and co-host Terry Romero
    On set with Toni Fiore, guest Elizabeth Fraser and and co-host Terry Romero

    It's cooked up with not just one but a pantry full of talented cooks and authors.

    Toni Fiore lives in Maine and has hosted several Delicious TV projects, including Delicious TV’s Totally Vegetarian which has aired over 55,000 times on public television. Terry Hope Romero lives in NYC and is the author of bestselling vegan cookbooks Veganomicon, Vegan Eats World, Salad Samurai and many more. Terry also presents informative and lively cooking demonstrations around the globe. Miyoko Schinner lives in the Bay Area of San Francisco and has authored several cookbooks including Artisan Vegan Cheese and The Homemade Vegan Pantry. She recently launched Miyoko’s Kitchen, a new artisan vegan cheese company.

    Why is it different than an internet cooking show?

    Internet shows are great. And we're available online. It's public television though where more people like your former co-worker, mom or neighbor, unfamiliar with healthy, plant-based eating, will stumble upon the show flipping the channels one random day. Next thing you know - BOOM! - mom is cooking up a scrumptious vegan supper for you all to enjoy!

    We hear repeatedly from parents who watch the show with their kids. And even kids who get their parents to watch it with them! We are committed to engaging diverse viewers and those viewers who are limited by income.

    What will I learn if I already know how to make a salad and spaghetti?

    Toni's Torta di Cici from our Street Food episode
    Toni's Torta di Cici from our Street Food episode

    Compared to the very few kinds of animals on earth that humans eat (maybe 20 including dogs), there are 300,000 plants. You’re going to learn about new dishes, flavors, vegetables, sauces, condiments, and more.

    Terry's Maple Breakfast Sausages from our Chefs Favorites episode
    Terry's Maple Breakfast Sausages from our Chefs Favorites episode

    By swapping out simple ingredients and veganizing popular dishes without any loss of flavor and texture, these chefs prove it takes only a small shift to make a huge difference. Encouraging viewers to start such a transition by incorporating these recipes into their meal plans makes it clear that change doesn’t need to be “all-or-nothing” to be powerful.

    Berry Galette
    Berry Galette

    Everyone starts somewhere — the point is to … start!

    Ok how do I see this show?

    We'll let you know when it airs on television. Click the link below to pick your reward of choice. Like watch seasons 1 and or 2 online. Or catch the new season before it hits public television so you’ll be sure not to miss it.

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    A vegan article from the NY Times…

  • Lane
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  • Saturday, October 3, 2015





  • Below are excerpts from a vegan article from the NY Times that I thought you might like, Veganism has been edging into the mainstream for years now, coaxed along by superstar believers like Bill Clinton and Beyoncé. But lately, as plant-based eating has blossomed and gained followers, influential vegans are laboring to supplant its dowdy, […]

    Below are excerpts from a vegan article from the NY Times that I thought you might like,

    Veganism has been edging into the mainstream for years now, coaxed along by superstar believers like Bill Clinton and Beyoncé. But lately, as plant-based eating has blossomed and gained followers, influential vegans are laboring to supplant its dowdy, spartan image with a new look: glamorous, prosperous, sexy and epidermally beaming with health.

    The evidence is bountiful — at restaurants on both coasts and in cookbooks, on blogs and throughout social media. “Being a vegan has crossed over into fashion territory,” said Kerry Diamond, the editor of Yahoo Food and the editorial director of Cherry Bombe magazine. Decades back “there was nothing chic about it,” she said. “Now it’s become a thing.”

    Mr. Roll, who also wrote the best-selling “Finding Ultra,” about his midlife search for truth and health while switching to a vegan diet and pushing himself to compete in grueling athletic challenges, acknowledges that the dreamy visuals in “The Plantpower Way” are meant to give vegan living a more vogue-ish spin.

    “It was a very conscious effort to kind of counterprogram,” he said. “Our whole idea was to present this lifestyle in an aspirational and modern way. We want to present it in a way that looks appealing, as opposed to deprivation-oriented.” Or as Ms. Piatt described it, “There’s no body odor coming off the pages.”

    People have adopted veganism for virtuous reasons, but vanity plays an undeniable role as well. It’s not uncommon to hear vegans mooning over “the glow,” an irresistible incandescence that starts to emanate from within after a few weeks or months of eating only plants. (To cite one example: “The Oh She Glows Cookbook.”)

    Vegan cooking itself has gone through a stark transformation, and so has the way it is sold: In some coastal pockets, at least, stern sermons have been replaced by the seductive allure of la dolce vita. Nonvegans are welcomed, not shunned. “The message has changed,” said Kathy Freston, an author and vegan proponent. “And we have moved away from that old dogma.”

    “That’s still what people think of when they think of vegan food,” said the musician Moby, 50, who has been a vegan for 28 years. But lately he has been immersed in the writing of chefs like Thomas Keller and Alice Waters as he gears up for the November opening of Little Pine, a vegan restaurant he is opening in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles. Moby wants it to be, he said, “a wonderful restaurant even when judged by conventional standards.”

    Vegan glam is on full display at Crossroads, a restaurant on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, where this month servers grandly hauled to tables a gleaming “seafood tower” that looked like something Orson Welles would order at an Old Hollywood nightclub. Instead of lobster, it had lobster mushrooms; in place of calamari, sustainably harvested hearts of palm. And was that oysters Rockefeller? No, it was an artichoke leaf cradling a shiitake mushroom that had been poached in olive oil and covered with spinach and bread crumbs.

    And nonvegans, in turn, seem less likely to be dismissive. Chad Sarno, a 39-year-old chef and culinary educator in Austin, Tex., remembers a time when you’d step into a restaurant and “you would say the vegan word and the chef would look at you like you had three heads and just got off the commune.” Now, with influential nonvegan chefs like David Kinch and Alain Passard rhapsodizing about the glory of vegetables, the dialogue has shifted. “Plants are so sexy,” Mr. Sarno said.

    A few decades back it would have been hard to conceive of Avant Garden, which opened days ago in the East Village, with the chef Andrew D’Ambrosi in the kitchen whipping up dishes like potato cannelloni with pine-nut ricotta, arugula pesto and eggplant.

    “I just want to do a really nice, upscale vegan restaurant that breaks the mold of what people think vegan restaurants are,” said Ravi DeRossi, the owner of Avant Garden and the entrepreneur behind New York spots like Bergen Hill and Amor y Amargo.

    In New York, diners can easily opt to go fully vegan at Superiority Burger, Dimes and the Butcher’s Daughter. There is a steady line out the door during lunchtime at By Chloe, where the chef Chloe Coscarelli, at 27 already the author of several cookbooks, stresses that her veggie burgers and quinoa taco salads will not leave diners hungrily chomping on their own knuckles. “I want to be normal,” she said, and By Chloe’s alluring and clever presence on Instagram suggests that it has no intention of sulking in the margins.

    “We didn’t want it to scream vegan, we wanted it to scream food and fun and delicious,” Ms. Coscarelli said. “Why do we have to make it a downer to be in here?”

    If you'd like to read the entire article, click here: vegan article from the NY Times

     

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    What are you doing Friday, October 2? Here’s what:

  • Lane
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  • Friday, September 11, 2015
  • FARM






      FARM (Farm Animal Rights Movement) is deeply into planning the 33rd annual World Day for Farmed Animals (http://dayforanimals.org), an international day of action that typically includes vigils, marches, and demonstrations to honor the suffering and deaths of farmed animals. Last year people in over 95 countries participated — the biggest yet. Like last year, […]

     

    FARM (Farm Animal Rights Movement) is deeply into planning the 33rd annual World Day for Farmed Animals (http://dayforanimals.org), an international day of action that typically includes vigils, marches, and demonstrations to honor the suffering and deaths of farmed animals. Last year people in over 95 countries participated -- the biggest yet.

    Like last year, FARM is encouraging participation in several ways:

    Demonstrate: Find an event near you, or organize one. FARM's grassroots activists around the world meet at slaughterhouses and other animal ag facilities, even a fish farm, to oppose the inherent abuse of animals for food. FARM offers plenty of assistance in planning a demo, and a listing of all events happening worldwide.
    http://dayforanimals.org/demonstrate

    Educate: Leafleting is a tried-and-true tactic for exposing people to the ethics of veganism. FARM provides materials to anyone willing to commit to handing out 200 brochures on World Day for Farmed Last year, more than 1700 FARM activists distributed 320,000 leaflets in a single day.
    http://dayforanimals.org/educate

    Fast: Since 1978, FARM's founder Dr. Alex Hershaft has fasted on World Day for Farmed Animals -- but he never told anyone about this intensely personal action until last year, when he invited the public to join him. More than 12,000 people, on six continents, did. Those who couldn't attend a demo, or preferred to observe the occasion privately, felt a great solidarity in joining the #fastagainstslaughter.
    http://dayforanimals.org/pledge

    Break the Fast: This year, FARM is also encouraging people to gather and celebrate with their communities at "Break the Fast" breakfast meetups Saturday morning, October 3rd, at a local restaurant or a potluck at home.
    http://dayforanimals.org/demonstrate#break-the-fast-october-3rd-meetup

    Share: Here's where you come in! The impact of all of the public and private actions we take on World Day for Farmed Animals can be magnified when we share. It's why Kezia and I have helped to promote the event for several years, and we hope you'll help too by telling your friends and followers. FARM has assembled a small library of images, tweets, and FB posts at the link below.
    http://dayforanimals.org/share

    65 billion farmed land animals are killed for food every year. We're asking people to join FARM on October 2 -- the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, an outspoken advocate of non-violence towards animals -- and get involved in whatever way they can.

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    Raw Veggie Sushi + Music Benefit for Kiss the Ground Garden

  • Lane
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  • kiss the ground vegan sushi benefit






     Join vegan chef Tricia Eastman along with chef Mallori Simko for an a class, a dinner, and music with suggested donation of $45-$60. For more information and tickets kisstheground.com/garden All proceeds will benefit Kiss the Ground’s garden and the classes that the garden provides to homeless/low-income. Special thanks to Omega blenders and Kyocera knives for contributing kitchen equipment to create this […]

     Join vegan chef Tricia Eastman along with chef Mallori Simko for an a class, a dinner, and music with suggested donation of $45-$60. For more information and tickets kisstheground.com/garden All proceeds will benefit Kiss the Ground's garden and the classes that the garden provides to homeless/low-income. Special thanks to Omega blenders and Kyocera knives for contributing kitchen equipment to create this event that will support the community and greening our planet!
    6pm
    Vegan Sushi Class & Dinner
    Learn how to make vegan sushi rolls with raw vegetables and superfood ingredients fresh from your garden or local farmers market
    Nosh on rolls and raw appetizers while getting some hands on experience. Space is limited due to materials for class. Knives will be used at your own risk.
    8pm
    Dessert & Dance (DJ)
    Coconut Wasabi Cheesecake with a live music and dancing.
    About the chefs:
    Tricia Eastman is a pioneer in the age of the “spiritual makeover” with a mission to inspire others to live healthier lives in every way. Eastman incorporates alternative healing modalities along with medicinal foods into her programs and coaching. To learn more about her work, please visit www.lovejuju.com
    Mallori Simko is a Culinary Visionary who enhances standard fare by reinventing traditional recipes with highly favorable living food. Through creating harmony with the natural laws of the Universe, she develops plant-based, intelligent conscious cuisine using the ancient wisdom of food alchemy and regenerative well-being.
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    Vegan Cheese Review: Miyoko’s Kitchen

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  • Sunday, August 16, 2015
  • Source: Miyoko's Kitchen






    Over the years Jane and I have worked our way through a variety of vegan cheeses. While we’ve been enthusiastic about many of them initially, over time we’ve come to eschew eating vegan cheese as a whole. Ultimately, vegan cheese just doesn’t work for us and the most basic reason is that it is NOT […]

    Over the years Jane and I have worked our way through a variety of vegan cheeses. While we've been enthusiastic about many of them initially, over time we've come to eschew eating vegan cheese as a whole. Ultimately, vegan cheese just doesn't work for us and the most basic reason is that it is NOT cheese; the consistency, the mouth-feel, the aftertaste simply do not compare to the real cheese which exists in both our memories. Consequently, none of the products we had previously tried have remained on our shopping list.

    miyoko's kitchenRecently, we were asked to sample Miyoko's Creamery cheeses in exchange for a review. We agreed, but were not expecting to be wowed, despite other bloggers reviews. Can I just say, “OMG!” This could be real cheese, or at least what we recall real cheese to be. It's edible on it's own – meaning you can serve it with wine and crackers and it tastes delicious! It is so good that even though there were recipe suggestions (and some of them sounded quite delicious), we ate the cheese on its own. We still haven't bothered to try to cook with it... not even a grilled cheese sandwich.

    And, when our samples ran out, we bought more. As a matter of fact, as I am writing this post, Jane is purchasing some of Miyokos Creamery cheese right now!

    We're fortunate to live in Los Angeles where we can find Miyoko's Creamery cheeses in a variety of stores. You can look on their website for a list of stores that sell the cheeses.The vast majority of stores that sell their products are on the west coast:

    Miyokos kitchen vegan cheese locations

    If you're interested in trying them out yourself and don't live in a distribution zone, you can always order their products online. However, I would not order the Fresh Loire Valley in a Fig Leaf over the summer. Ours arrived moldy, so we tossed it. Jane was bummed about that as the aroma of the cheese appealed to her more than any of the others, and none of our local stores are carrying that particular variety.

    Our two favorites were the Aged English Sharp Cheddar and the Aged English Smoked Farmhouse, they reminded us of a cheddar and a smoked Gouda. But in reality, we enjoyed most all of the cheeses. The only one we didn't care for was the Country Style Herbes de Provence; neither us cared for the lavender/spice blend that coated the cheese. So we cut it away, and voila... a cheese which appealed to our palettes. Also, we didn't much care for the ash on the Mt. Vesuvious Black Ash, it left our fingers and mouths black and ashy, and, in our opinions, didn't add to the cheese at all, so we wound up cutting that away too; however, the base cheese was quite yummy. Miyoko's Creamery cheeses are now a staple in our home.

    vegan cruise

    Checking their website, I see that in September, they will be in Toronto and Los Angeles at upcoming festivals and on a vegan cruise to Alaska. Vegan cruise?! Sounds appealing. We went on a cruise to Alaska many years ago; pre-vegan. Having never been on a cruise before that, I anticipated lots and lots of incredible food. Instead, we found lots and lots of rather ordinary, average, okay, sub-par food. We laughed and thought, "we're the only ones that lost weight on a cruise." Now a vegan cruise...  that sounds interesting, but there's too much going on this year. Maybe next year... Knowing that there's a vegan cruise with culinary providers like Miyoko's Kitchen will keep us  interested.

    For now, we'll just happily head over to one of our local stores that carries Miyoko's cheese and enjoy!

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