The Best Protein You Can Eat

  • Lane
  • Leave a comment
  • Friday, July 31, 2015
  • SOURCE: STEFFEN ZAHN via FLICKR






    Last week, I asked you: What’s the number one question every vegan is asked? Of course, it’s: Where do you get your protein? An article published today in US News & World Report discusses the top 9 sources of protein; several of the sources are plant based, none are red meat or “the other white meat.” […]

    Last week, I asked you: What’s the number one question every vegan is asked? Of course, it's: Where do you get your protein? An article published today in US News & World Report discusses the top 9 sources of protein; several of the sources are plant based, none are red meat or "the other white meat."

    A study performed by Rajavel Elango, a nutrition and metabolism researcher with the University of British Columbia’s School of Population and Public Health discusses the nine essential amino acids. It indicates -- for most vegetarians, vegans, and readers of our website, this is nothing new -- that you can get those nine essential amino acids from animal protein, but no one plant-based provides all nine essential amino acids; you need to get them from a variety of sources.

    Since this is a vegan website, I'll only list those protein sources that are plant based, starting with number four on their list, grains:

    SOURCE: SUSANNE NILSSON via FLICKR
    SOURCE: SISANNE NILSSON via FLICKR

    Whole Grains

    These heart-healthy grains contain more protein than complex carbs (which are vital to your fiber intake, heart health and weight-loss success). Among the best sources are quinoa, bulgur and freekeh, White says. All contain 6 or more grams per cooked cup, and quinoa is actually one of the few “complete” plant-based proteins out there, meaning it contains all of the nine essential amino acids.

    SOURCE: UNITED SOY BEAN BOARD via FLICKR
    SOURCE: UNITED SOY BEAN BOARD via FLICKR

    Legumes

    These guys are as rich in protein as they are in heart-healthy fiber. Plus, they're solid sources of B vitamins, according to Elango. Opt for beans, lentils, soybeans (edamame) and peas. Even peas contain 8 grams of protein per cup. Impressive, no?

    SOURCE: STEFFEN ZAHN via FLICKR
    SOURCE: STEFFEN ZAHN via FLICKR

    Nuts

    They are known for being rich in healthy unsaturated fatty acids, but they’ve also got a lot of protein going on. Plus, people who eat a handful of nuts per day are 20 percent less likely to die from any cause compared to those who don’t eat nuts, according to a 2013 New England Journal of Medicine study.

    SOURCE: ALICE HENNEMAN via FLICKR
    SOURCE: ALICE HENNEMAN via FLICKR

    Leafy Greens

    Calorie for calorie, kale, collard greens and other leafy greens are surprisingly rich in protein. For instance, a 70-calorie serving of spinach contains about 10 grams of protein. While greens don’t contain all of the amino acids you need, pairing them with beans and legumes can help make them “complete” with the nine essential amino acids.

    So four of the top nine sources of protein are plant-based. As indicated, vegans need to get protein from multiple sources. My favorite was is via my daily smoothie. Each morning, I have a smoothie which contains kale or some other leafy green like spinach and almond butter or peanut butter amongst several other ingredients; typically a banana and whatever fresh or frozen fruit we have on hand. The combination or leafy greens and nut butters ensures that I am my daily dose of complete protein.

    Make sure that all of you maintain a plant-based diet are getting all of your nine essential amino acids every day. And tell your friends that your sources of protein are better sources than red meat and pork... at least according to this study.

     

    -->

    Luxury Vegan Boot Camp — In France?!

  • Lane
  • 1 Comment
  • Sunday, July 26, 2015
  • camp biche






    Last year Jane and I vacationed in France. I really enjoyed the countryside in France and Paris, but being vegan in France is VERY  difficult. Man cannot live on baguette alone… While most restaurants were accommodating, we basically had to order off the menu at nearly every restaurant that we ate at. I recall, on […]

    Last year Jane and I vacationed in France. I really enjoyed the countryside in France and Paris, but being vegan in France is VERY  difficult.

    Man cannot live on baguette alone...
    While most restaurants were accommodating, we basically had to order off the menu at nearly every restaurant that we ate at. I recall, on our flight home, saying to Jane, "I think we may be the only people to go to Paris as say, 'Nice place, but the food was forgettable.'" We may have been unimpressed by the vegan fare in France, future vegans heading to France might have a more enjoyable culinary experience than we did.

    Meet Craig Resnick and Libby Pratt, former investing traders who have opened a high-end spa in France: Camp Biche. Originally, Camp Biche served classic French cuisine, accompanied by wine and dessert, prepared by an in-house chef. “After he died of cancer, my wife’s father was diagnosed with colorectal cancer,” says Resnick.

    Pratt’s physician told her to stop eating meat so they adopted a vegan lifestyle.

    “When Libby and I saw the changes a vegan regime was making in us, we started serving vegan food to clients, including wine and dessert,” explains Resnick. “So now, we are ‘the original vegan luxury fitness boot camp’.”

    A typical Camp Biche day . . .

    6:15 Wake up knock at your door with a cup of tea or coffee.

    6:30 - 7:55 morning warmup, Camp Biche abdominal workout, yoga / Pilates with high intensity moves and stretching exercises

    camp biche8:00 - 8:25 Breakfast of granola, fresh-fruit salad, yogurt, tea or coffee.

    8:30 Out the door for the 3 to 4 hour hike

    Walk at your own pace, we'll have both a human and a canine guide to accompany you.

    12:30 Dejeuner/Lunch!

    By the way, we eat like the French which means no snacking between meals.

    14:45 – 16:45 Fitness with Becs. Learn to unlock your energy with squats, lunges and a smile. You will work the muscles that you never knew you had whilst having fun. Free-Weight Training

    Sometime after 16:45 you'll be rewarded with either an hour-long massage or a facial to soothe your tired muscles.

    Between lunch and dinner, you'll have one to three hours to read a good book by the pool, take a nap, call your family, or if you must, conduct business or sneak off to the village bar.

    19:45 In the evening we’ll pamper you with an evocative and elegant mansion house meal. In the flickering candlelight, or firelight if the night is nippy. You’ll sample locally-sourced, vegan, plant-based dishes cooked with French panache. In fact, all of their food is prepared from scratch from the best ingredients, locally sourced and organic whenever possible, complemented with the region’s finest wines together with -- according to their website -- fascinating conversation as the most interesting people in the world gather around the table.

    They take a maximum of 6 guests at any one time.

    Price includes:

    • Six nights in a beautiful ensuite room in a 800 year-old mansion

    • Three gourmet, vegan meals per day, evening meals with Cahors wine -- occassionally, we pop a few Champagne corks.

    • Full-morning treks through the magical Midi-Pyrenees countryside

    • Experienced bi-lingual French/English guides and instructors

    • Morning and afternoon fitness classes

    • Daily massages or spa treatments

    • Airport and train transfers

     

    The price: 5900 €, all inclusive for a private room. (by the way, 5900 € is about $6,500 today as the Euro and the dollar are nearly at par; a year ago when the exchange rate was more like 1.30:1.00, that would've been about $7,670)

    If you are interest in learning more about Camp Biche, you can check out their website, campbiche.com or contact them directly at: campbiche@gmail.com

    -->

    Are Mock Meats Safe?

  • Lane
  • Leave a comment
  • Tuesday, July 21, 2015
  • Source: peta.org






    I wrote a recent article about protein; the number one question: Where to vegans get their protein? One of our readers, Marko M. Vegano (nice name, by the way… ), asked whether eating a steady diet of mock meats; those alternative meat products recently made popular by companies like Gardein and Beyond meat, is a reasonable, […]

    I wrote a recent article about protein; the number one question: Where to vegans get their protein? One of our readers, Marko M. Vegano (nice name, by the way... ), asked whether eating a steady diet of mock meats; those alternative meat products recently made popular by companies like Gardein and Beyond meat, is a reasonable, safe thing to do.

    Vegano wrote:

    I love the Gardien and Beyond Meat products. They are loaded with proteins, but do have some have high sodium. I can eat a whole bag in one day. Three meals. I do include a side of grain or starches and a veg. And I eat fruits throughout the day. And also snack on nuts or include them in a salad or cereal. Is this safe to do?

    In short, no... mock meats are processed foods, many are high in sodium and are highly processed; relying on such products as your main source of protein is not necessarily the healthiest way to eat. You’re better off getting the cast majority of your protein from whole foods, including legumes, nuts, seeds, and whole grains.

    Mock meats are not new; they've been around for a very long time. Tofu and seitan have been used mainly in Asian societies for centuries; the history of tofu dates back to the Han Dynasty (206  - 220 BC). But today, when people think of mock meats, they are likely not thinking of tofu, they are probably thinking of those tasty highly processed packaged products from Gardein, Beyond Meat, etc.

    Source: peta.org
    Source: peta.org

    Don't get me wrong, I eat my share of these products; when we can't think what to make for dinner, we might grab a package of Gardein from our freezer, pop it in the toaster-oven and then typically serve it a tortilla filled with lots fresh greens, tomatoes, avocado, and a dash of hot sauce. Yum! We also eat Field Roast products, especially at Thanksgiving; my favorite holiday, makes my mouth water just thinking about it. That said, we don't eat those products all that often. How often is reasonable? Are they bad for you? Our friends at Berkeley Wellness wrote an excellent article on the subject of the emergence of fake meat as an acceptable meat alternative for both meat-eaters and non meat-eaters alike. Here's a snippet:

    A downside is that meat substitutes are typically high in sodium, comparable to many deli meats. Some have more than 400 milligrams of sodium per serving. And unless they’re fortified with vitamins and minerals, as some are, they tend to be lacking in vitamin B12, iron, zinc, and other nutrients found in meat. Note also that many have long lists of additives, including artificial flavors, colorings, gums, sugars, and preservatives.

    The eco-angle
    You may think it’s environmentally virtuous to choose a veggie burger over a meat burger, yet mock meats are usually highly processed foods that are not eco-friendly in all ways. Vegetarian meals are generally associated with lower greenhouse gas emissions and less impact on global warming, but according to a 2010 paper in Food Research International, it takes about the same amount of energy to produce a pea-burger as it does a pork chop, calorie for calorie, because of the processing, storing, and other factors involved.

    Then there are issues associated with the farming of soybeans. As some critics note, industrial soybean farming has devastated rainforests in Brazil, one of the world’s top soybean producers, and has taken over much of the cropland in America and wiped out grasslands at an accelerated pace in recent years—though, in reality, most soy is grown for animal feed, edible oil, and biofuel.

    Another concern is how the beans are processed. Hexane, a chemical solvent used to remove the oil from soybeans in the manufacturing of most processed soy foods, is a neurotoxin and an air pollutant. If you want to avoid hexane-processed soy foods, buy USDA organic products, since hexane is banned in organic food production.

    Many soy-based meat substitutes are also made from genetically modified (GMO) soybeans. Though the environmental and health effects of GMOs are still being debated, you can avoid them by looking for “GMO-free” on the label; by definition, certified organic foods are also GMO-free.

    5 more faux-meat tidbits

    • Meat substitutes vary a lot in fat, calories, sodium, protein, and other nutrients. In general, products made with soy protein, textured vegetable protein, or wheat gluten are higher in protein than those made primarily from whole vegetables and grains.
    • Veggie meats are not necessarily vegan. Many contain egg whites (as a binder), casein (a milk protein), cheese (which also adds calories and fat), and some other animal-derived ingredients.
    • Meat substitutes often contain common food allergens, including wheat, nuts, soy, and dairy. If you’re allergic to any of these, be sure to check the labels.
    • Meat substitutes are far less likely to be contaminated with bacteria, such as E. coli, than real meat—though you should still follow the cooking directions carefully to be safe (and for the best taste and texture).
    • Less-processed meat substitutes include tofu, tempeh, and seitan and can be used in place of meat in many recipes.

    Faux meats, meat alternatives, mock meat, fake meat, meat analogues... whatever you call them, they mean the same thing. Wikipedia describes them as: a food made from non-meats, sometimes without other animal products, such as dairy. The market for meat imitations includes vegetarians, vegans, non-vegetarians seeking to reduce their meat consumption for health or ethical reasons, and people following religious dietary laws in Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism.

    (by the way: BerkeleyWellness is a great website; they are the leading online resource for evidence-based wellness information, BerkeleyWellness.com is a collaboration between the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley, and a national team of writers and editors. It features articles from the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter as well as original content and updates. )

    I couldn't agree with the Berkeley Wellness' response to this issue more. My suggestion is that is you want to eat mock meats, have at it; but like most things in life, consume them in moderation, they should not be your primary source of protein.

    Now it's your turn:
    Do you eat mock meats? If so, do you eat them frequently: Daily? Weekly? Four times a day? 😉

    -->

    What’s the number one question every vegan is asked?

  • Lane
  • 7 Comments
  • Sunday, July 19, 2015
  • Edamame_-_boild_green_soybeans






    What’s the first question every vegan gets asked? Where do you get your protein? If it’s not the first question, it’s certainly one of the top three questions. Protein is critical to a human diet, but it doesn’t need to be animal protein; there are many reasonable plant based alternative sources. Protein is built from […]

    What's the first question every vegan gets asked? Where do you get your protein? If it's not the first question, it's certainly one of the top three questions.

    Protein is critical to a human diet, but it doesn't need to be animal protein; there are many reasonable plant based alternative sources. Protein is built from building blocks called amino acids. Our bodies make amino acids in two different ways: Either from scratch, or by modifying others. A few amino acids (known as the essential amino acids) must come from food.

    • Animal sources of protein tend to deliver all the amino acids we need.
    • Other protein sources, such as fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts and seeds, lack one or more essential amino acids.

    Edamame_-_boild_green_soybeans

    Eat a variety of protein sources throughout the day
    Vegetarians need to be aware of this. You can also get sufficient protein from plant-based foods if you eat a variety of them throughout the day. Vegans need to eat a variety of protein-containing foods each day in order to get all the amino acids needed to make new protein from plant sources, such as soy products and meat substitutes, legumes, lentils, nuts, seeds and whole grains.

    While meats may be protein packed, they may contain excessive amounts of fats and salt

    • Some high-protein foods are healthier than others because of what comes along with the protein: healthy fats or harmful ones, beneficial fiber or hidden salt. It’s this protein package that’s likely to make a difference for health. For example, a 6-ounce broiled porterhouse steak is a great source of protein—about 40 grams worth. But it also delivers about 12 grams of saturated fat. For someone who eats a 2,000 calorie per day diet, that’s more than 60 percent of the recommended daily intake for saturated fat.
    • A 6-ounce ham steak has only about 2.5 grams of saturated fat, but it’s loaded with sodium—2,000 milligrams worth, or about 500 milligrams more than the daily sodium max.
    • 6-ounces of wild salmon has about 34 grams of protein and is naturally low in sodium, and contains only 1.7 grams of saturated fat. Salmon and other fatty fish are also excellent sources of omega-3 fats, a type of fat that’s especially good for the heart.
    • A cup of cooked lentils provides about 18 grams of protein and 15 grams of fiber, and it has virtually no saturated fat or sodium.

    Vegans may need to a considerable amount of food in order to get their proper protein intake. The Institute of Medicine recommends that adults get a minimum of 8 grams of protein for every 22 pounds of body weight. That means that a 150 lb. person should consume about 55 grams of protein every single day. That said, the Institute of Medicine also sets a wide range for acceptable protein intake; anywhere from 10% to 35% of the calories consumed each day. If you consume 2000 calories per day, then 200 to 700 calories should come from protein. Beyond that, there’s relatively little solid information on the ideal amount of protein in the diet or the healthiest target for calories contributed by protein.

    In the United States, the recommended daily allowance of protein is 46 grams per day for women over 19 years of age, and 56 grams per day for men over 19 years of age.

    Around the world, millions of people don’t get enough protein. Protein malnutrition leads to the condition known as kwashiorkor. Lack of protein can cause growth failure, loss of muscle mass, decreased immunity, weakening of the heart and respiratory system, and death.

    Aren't Nuts Too Fattening?
    People have concerns about certain plant-based protein sources and weight gain. The same high-protein foods that are good choices for disease prevention may also help with weight control. People presume that eating nuts as a source of protein results in weight gain due to the fat content in nuts.

    Researchers at Harvard School of Public Health followed the diet and lifestyle habits of 120,000 men and women for up to 20 years, looking at how small changes contributed to weight gain over time.

    • Those who ate more red and processed meat over the course of the study gained more weight, about one extra pound every four years, while those who ate more nuts over the course of the study gained less weight, about a half pound less every four years.
    • One study showed that eating approximately one daily serving of beans, chickpeas, lentils or peas can increase fullness, which may lead to better weight management and weight loss.

    There’s no need to go overboard on protein. Though some studies show benefits of high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets in the short term, avoiding fruits and whole grains means missing out on healthful fiber, vitamins, minerals, and other phytonutrients.

     

    -->

    The kitchen will for sure be a very different place in 10 years

  • Lane
  • 1 Comment
  • Saturday, July 18, 2015
  • foodini 3d food printer






    3D printers will make food in the future; the not too distant future. Natural Machines, the maker of Foodini, a 3D food printer, had a successful kickstarter program. The company believes that their product will be as revolutionary to the kitchen as the microwave was back in the 1970’s. They see their product as a […]

    3D printers will make food in the future; the not too distant future. Natural Machines, the maker of Foodini, a 3D food printer, had a successful kickstarter program. The company believes that their product will be as revolutionary to the kitchen as the microwave was back in the 1970's.

    They see their product as a way for people to easily make nutritious home made meals quickly and easily, eliminating the need to buy processed foods for those who don't have hours to prepare their meals. Their goal is to make healthy, nutritious meals using fresh ingredients.

    You may be familiar with 3D printers already, apparently, this product isn't too different from a regular 3D printer, but instead of printing with plastics, it deploys edible ingredients squeezed out of stainless steel capsules: "It's the same technology," says Lynette Kucsma, co-founder of Natural Machines, "but with plastics there's just one melting point, whereas with food it's different temperatures, consistencies and textures. Also, gravity works a little bit against us, as food doesn't hold the shape as well as plastic."

    Foodini, which raised $80, 279 on Kickstarter, looks to create a 3-D food printer for the consumer market.

    Production systems are also advancing from initiatives such as NASA’s project to print food in deep space; SMRC, a NASA contractor, created pizzas and chocolate from processes integrating dry and liquid ingredients. Cornell University’s Creative Machines lab and TNO in the Netherlands are working on food material properties. As TVO’s Kjeid van Bommel points out, there will be an appetite for new tastes, textures and designs from this style of food preparation.

    Established players in the food industry need to understand the potential impact of this technology on their business and how the ecosystem will evolve, where software will replace recipes, and the Internet of Things will connect all aspects of the “cooking” cycle to consumers.

    The kitchen will for sure be a very different place in 10 years.

    The Barcelona-based startup behind the machine says it's the only one of its kind capable of printing a wide range of dishes, from sweet to savory. In essence, this is a mini food manufacturing plant shrunk down to the size of an oven. Lynette Kucsma, co-founder of Natural Machines

    "In essence, this is a mini food manufacturing plant shrunk down to the size of an oven," Kucsma said, pointing out that at least in the initial stage the printer will be targeted mostly at professional kitchen users, with a consumer version to follow, at a projected retail price of around $1,000.

    In principle, the Foodini sounds like the ultimate laziness aid: press a button to print your ravioli. But Natural Machines is quick to point out that it's designed to take care only of the difficult and time-consuming parts of food preparation that discourage people from cooking at home, and that it promotes healthy eating by requiring fresh ingredients prepared before printing.

    Nevertheless, the company is working with major food manufacturers to create pre-packaged plastic capsules that can just be loaded into the machine to make food, even though they assure these will be free of preservatives, with a shelf life limited to five days.

    The printing process is slow, but faster than regular 3D printing. Other than being capable of creating complex designs, such as very detailed cake decorations or food arranged in unusual shapes, the Foodini can be useful for recipes that require precision and dexterity, like homemade pizza or filled pasta.

    We are really excited to announce that Foodini will ship with built-in 3D scanner hardware. We’ve been working with our partners for quite some time to have this hardware installed in the first shipping units of Foodini, and today we can confirm that it will definitely be included.

    With a built-in 3D scanner, you can:

    • Scan an object, then save the resulting digital shape and print it (using chocolate, for example).
    • Scan an object, such as a dish, or a cupcake, and print on top of it. Great for plate decorations or adding decorations on food already made.

    The 3D scanner will have a resolution of 0.1mm.

    If you have already pledged for a Foodini via Kickstarter or purchased Foodini via other channels, your Foodini will automatically include this 3D scanner hardware – no action is necessary on your part. This additional feature is included FREE of charge: no additional charges will be added to your pledge.

    Full details can be found in update #2.

    Introduction

    Foodini is the first 3D food printer to print all types of real, fresh, nutritious foods, from savory to sweet. Designed for home and professional kitchens, Foodini comes with empty food capsules. You prepare and place fresh, real ingredients in Foodini. No fake food. No being forced to buy pre-filled food capsules. Made with fresh ingredients, this is real food... 3D printed.

    From CAD design (shown on laptop) to pre-production model.
    From CAD design (shown on laptop) to pre-production model.

    Our ethos of healthy eating and the variety of fresh ingredients we can print attracts a lot of interest. Natural Machines and Foodini have been covered enthusiastically by the media worldwide. A small sample:

    “Who wants a 3D printer for just candy when you can have one that prints a five-course dinner instead?” - Engadget

    "Instead of forcing people to rely on highly processed convenience food that’s larded with additives and unhealthy levels of salt, as microwave meals generally are, they want Foodini to get more people cooking with fresh ingredients, rather than reaching for that pre-processed packet." - TechCrunch

    "The Foodini 3D printer will take over your repetitive cooking tasks." - Gigaom

    “What it (the machine) does help with is the visuals and to create shapes that wouldn’t be possible without it.” -Michelin-starred chef

    “It’s been printed out? But how is it done? It’s good! It tastes like a normal cookie!” “It’s good. It can’t be from a printer. It’s really good!” “It tastes super delicious! It’s really good.” “It’s great! The shapes are imaginative.” “Tasty. Really tasty!” “What? That’s awesome!” –People on the street taste testing 3D printed food . Some TV crews that came to visit us took our 3D printed food to the streets for a taste test. There were some people who thought the idea of 3D printed food was a bit too radical and refused to try the food. But EVERYONE who tasted 3D printed food liked it!

    We were on live TV at the NASDAQ Times Square studios, appearing on CNBC's Fast Money show. Watch the segment! (April 2, 2014)

    We were on live TV at the Fox Business News studios, appearing on the Varney & Co show. Watch the segment! (April 3, 2014)

    Using 3D printing to eat healthier

    Too many people have abandoned food made with fresh ingredients in favor of pre-made processed food with lots of preservatives and additives. Now, 3D printing technology allows us to recover healthy habits by making homemade food preparation healthy, easier, and fun!

    Foodini takes on the difficult parts of making food that are hard and time consuming to make fully by hand. One of our goals is to streamline some of cooking's more repetitive activities - forming dough into fish-shaped crackers, or forming ravioli - to encourage more people to make fresh healthy foods.

    We understand that a kitchen appliance that happens to be a 3D food printer is a very new concept. Please take a look at our Frequently Asked Questions on our website where you will find more than 20 questions... and associated answers!

    Home Kitchen Users

    Don't buy pre-processed snacks and meals. Make healthier versions of the foods you are accustomed to by using fresh ingredients and tailor them to your tastes and needs (for example, adjust ingredients for any food intolerances or allergies).

    Presentation is everything with kids... print different shapes to encourage kids to eat healthy foods.
    Presentation is everything with kids... print different shapes to encourage kids to eat healthy foods.

    Professional Kitchen Users

    Star chefs enjoy experimenting in their restaurants. Kitchen devices are always state of the art, and food has designer elements. With Foodini, combine fresh homegrown produce with modern technology to create visuals and shapes that wouldn't be possible by hand.

    "Designer" food: Have fun with Foodini and print designer food presentations. Particularly interesting for chefs, restaurants and other food businesses.
    "Designer" food: Have fun with Foodini and print designer food presentations. Particularly interesting for chefs, restaurants and other food businesses.
    Create playful themed "sweet" prints, such as Halloween spiderweb cookies, chocolate christmas trees, chocolate vases, shell cookies...
    Create playful themed "sweet" prints, such as Halloween spiderweb cookies, chocolate christmas trees, chocolate vases, shell cookies...

    Foodini is a connected kitchen appliance with a community site

    Foodini has a built-in touch screen on the front, and the integrated application connects to an online community site where in addition to generally available content (viewing recipes, online demos, etc.), users will have access to a personalized online recipe box (favorites), and the ability to upload and share their own recipe creations.

    The community site will be viewable from the Foodini onboard touchscreen as well as your tablet, laptop, smartphone, etc. Browse recipes and create your printing layout while relaxing on your sofa.

    For the tech enthusiasts who love to create applications, we are releasing APIs for 3rd parties to customize recipe applications. For example, make the perfect ravioli configurator or use mathematical models to print intricate designed shapes.

    Select a recipe from Foodini's onboard touch screen. (This is a real screen shot!)
    Select a recipe from Foodini's onboard touch screen. (This is a real screen shot!)

    Once the user chooses the recipe they want to print, Foodini will instruct what food to put in each capsule, and then printing can begin.

    Default layouts are set to fill the entire plate. This allows for"quick print" abilities. If you choose, you can resize and change shapes, sizes and layouts.
    Default layouts are set to fill the entire plate. This allows for"quick print" abilities. If you choose, you can resize and change shapes, sizes and layouts.
    We're designing clean layouts on the user interface to keep Foodini easy to use.
    We're designing clean layouts on the user interface to keep Foodini easy to use.

    Foodini Hardware

    Foodini is a sleek kitchen appliance that will look stylish in any kitchen, be it a home kitchen or restaurant. It arrives ready for use (plug and play). A touch-screen mini-tablet that functions as the user interface is embedded on the front of the device.

    Some specs (final numbers may vary slightly in the shipping version)
    Some specs (final numbers may vary slightly in the shipping version)

    Where we are today

    We’ve been:

    • Working on building, designing, and proving the concept of Foodini since 2012.
    • Printing food for over a year on beta/concept/prototype/pre-production versions of Foodini.
    • Working with a major manufacturing partner to ensure high product quality and reliability, and they are committed to assisting with post-sales support. Major ecosystem production partners are in place.
    • Patenting and protecting Intellectual Property to ensure Foodini and the community can continue to develop and grow, and allows us to continue innovating in the 3D food printer space.
    • Bootstrapping the company, so we are very mindful of running a lean team and watching where every dollar goes... we will continue to do that with any Kickstarter support we receive.
    • Receiving interest from over 40 countries enquiring about purchasing Foodini, for use in both home and professional kitchens.

    We are ready for industrialization with your support. Kickstarter will enable us to produce an initial manufacturing run (early access/pre-series model; limited production run), subsequent first mass production run, and build out the community site to advanced levels.

    Together with your support, we can all bring Foodini into kitchens worldwide faster than would be able to otherwise. Some people have told us that the kitchen hasn't seen any major breakthroughs since the microwave, and Foodini could be it. Be a part of the next kitchen revolution!

    -->

    Vegan Trucker Loses 65 Pounds

  • Lane
  • Leave a comment
  • Sunday, July 12, 2015
  • vegan trucker before after






    This headline caught my eye. When you think of vegans, truck drivers are probably among the last people you would think of. Meet Bobby Anderson, a Mississippi trucker who, after 21 years as a truck driver, decided to go vegan. He eats a 100% whole food plant based diet while living in a truck 5 […]

    This headline caught my eye. When you think of vegans, truck drivers are probably among the last people you would think of. Meet Bobby Anderson, a Mississippi trucker who, after 21 years as a truck driver, decided to go vegan. He eats a 100% whole food plant based diet while living in a truck 5 to 6 days a week! The result? He dropped 65 lbs.

    Source: today.com

    Anderson dropped fast food, meats, and dairy and starting focusing on fruits and vegetables. He's also taken to making his own foods.

    He has posted some before and after pictures on his Instagram page.

    vegan trucker before after

    After seven months of vegan eating, he wrote:

    7 months on an all plant based diet, no tricks, no supplements except for a B12, almost no oil, no dairy, no meat, everything I eat is plant-based, lots of plant based starch, no calorie counting, no fat counting, no deprivation, I eat when I'm hungry and as much as I want, no more high blood pressure which means no more pills, no more anti-depressants, although winter has got be a little down, weight fluctuates but around 55 pounds have melted off, I feel awesome, and 95% of this has been accomplished in a semi truck away from home for all but 1 to 2 days a week!! There are no quick fixes to your health, be it weight or sickness, change what you eat and you change your life!!!

     

    This plant-based trucker, that's his Facebook page, offers up menu items on his page, like spring rolls.

    vegan trucker spring rolls

    They look awesome! He writes:

    Well I finally got them done, veggie spring rolls with peanut sauce and sweet and sour. The sweet and sour was devoured in the other 2 spring rolls that were the "test" dummies!! These are very good and very easy. I have rice noodles, cilantro, romaine, carrot sticks, and basil in a couple as well, all fresh and all raw except for the noodles that had to be boiled. These are really, really good.

    We recently wrote about packaged vegan Mac and Cheese. Well, our friend Mr. Anderson went one step further and made his own.

    vegan trucker mac and cheese

    Here's the recipe:

    Mac-and-no-cheese with Broccoli

    Ingredients

      • 1 serving brown rice noodles
      • 1/2 cup broccoli florets
    • "No-cheese"

      • 1 1/2 cups cold water
      • 1/4 cup canned cannelini beans
      • 3 tablespoons corn starch
      • 1 small roasted pepper
      • 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
      • 1 tablespoon salt
      • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

    Preparation

    1. Cook brown rice noodles based on box instructions. Once cooked, drain and set aside.
    2. Separately, mix "no-cheese" ingredients in nutri-bullet or blender.
    3. Add "no-cheese" mixture to medium saucepan over low heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon until thickened.
    4. Once the "no-cheese" has become a thick sauce, add in the cooked brown rice noodles. Finally, add in the broccoli florets.

     

    -->

    Today was our 8 year veganiversary

  • Lane
  • Leave a comment
  • Tuesday, July 7, 2015
  • 8 years vegan






    Today was our 8 year veganiversary. Eight years, and my how things have changed. When we first went vegan, we bought most of our staples at Whole Foods or the “hippie” store a few towns away. Gradually, we noticed vegan options were popping up at Trader Joe’s and our local chain grocery store, Ralph’s. (Yes, […]

    Today was our 8 year veganiversary.

    Eight years, and my how things have changed.

    When we first went vegan, we bought most of our staples at Whole Foods or the "hippie" store a few towns away. Gradually, we noticed vegan options were popping up at Trader Joe's and our local chain grocery store, Ralph's. (Yes, one of the chains here in So Cal is called Ralph's... Go figure!). But there were still things you simply couldn't replace like cheese and ice cream. Even cow's milk was hard to substitute, and not because we weren't used to it, the products were simply not as good. Today, that's all changed. While we still us a soy milk maker and make our own almond milk for most of our milk consumption, we love Silk’s Almond and Cashew milks on our morning cereal.

    The great thing about all these new products is that veganism is becoming more mainstream. We even found a wonderful store in Montana that had a great selection of vegan foods (and this was still a few years ago). Today, you can find vegan products in most grocery stores.

    Eight years ago, Jane wound up cooking most of our meals. Now when we're looking for someplace to eat, we have 15 restaurants we can rattle off without thinking about where to eat. If we give it some thought, we can always come up with more. We can even find vegan food available for consumption at most of the domestic airports we’ve traveled through recently, and I’m talking more than just hummus.

    But the one change that we are ambivalent about is the proliferation of packaged vegan goods. This is an excellent way to get main stream Americans eating vegan; however, it will certainly negate some of the health benefits of going vegan, which was the impetus for us to try a vegan diet in the first place. Interestingly, our health has remained excellent over the last decade; our cholesterol and other numbers have all remained fairly consistent. In contrast, many of our friends have started taking maintenance medications, or increased those medications. So, while we are not physicians ourselves, we believe our diet to have definitely had a positive impact on our health.

    The plethora of new vegan products might put an end to that though. We just reviewed Pastariso’s Vegan Mac and Uncheese, and we’re currently working our way through a number of Miyoko’s Creamery cheeses for a future review. (Spoiler: they’re delicious!)

    miyoko vegan cheese

    While both of these products are quite tasty and real competition for their non-vegan counterparts, I’m somewhat ambivalent about discovering them; Jane and I have both gained 3 pounds over the past two weeks. Yikes! It reminds me of when I first went vegetarian many eons ago; I wound up consuming cheese at every meal, and, until I got myself back under control, had to buy my jeans one size up.

    And Jane has recently become addicted to So Delicious Cashew based Snickerdoodle ice cream. These new nut milk ice creams are so much more palatable to us than any soy ice cream ever was. Jane was a real ice cream addict pre-vegan, and pined for the stuff for years. The Snickerdoodle vegan ice cream has won her over completely. Oh yeah, I love So Delicious' almond milk ice cream bars.

    Over this last (almost) decade, we have actually moved from being vegan because of our health, to being vegan because of our concern for the welfare of animals. As we learned more about the cruelty perpetrated on livestock in order to feed the masses, we wound up on the other side of the equation. Even if we wanted to eat meat again, neither of believes our consciences could allow that. This philosophy makes it easy to applaud all the veganized food products out there, healthy or otherwise.

    For us, it will be a matter of finding a balance. Since we plan on being vegan for the rest of our lives, we are thrilled to have all these new products popping up. We’ll certainly be incorporating many of them into our lives; we’ll just have to make sure we don’t consume too much!

    -->

    Vegan Mac and Cheese

  • Lane
  • 2 Comments
  • Sunday, July 5, 2015
  • 18_Vegan2---Copy






    Once upon a non-vegan life, Mac and Cheese was one of our comfort foods. Jane would doctor it with ground turkey, broccoli, and cumin, to make it somewhat more nutritous and more appealing to the adult palette. Since we’ve been vegan, Jane has tried a number of Mac and Cheese recipes, going all the way […]

    18_Vegan2---Copy

    Once upon a non-vegan life, Mac and Cheese was one of our comfort foods. Jane would doctor it with ground turkey, broccoli, and cumin, to make it somewhat more nutritous and more appealing to the adult palette.

    vegan mac cheese nutritional list

    Since we've been vegan, Jane has tried a number of Mac and Cheese recipes, going all the way back to the vegan mac and cheesedisasterous and unappealing Veganomicon recipe. We've long since written it off our list of things we eat even though many of you have offered recipe suggestions that sound quite appealing.

    So imagine my delight when Pastariso asked us to review the Mac Uncheddar. Truthfully, we didn't have high hopes, especially since it's gluten free as well as vegan. But we gamely opted to try it.

    The package is only 5 ounces, so it's smaller than I remember the Mac and Cheese boxes of my non-vegan life. Jane made two boxes, which was supposed to be 5 servings, but really only made 3 as far as we were concerned. If you're eating it as a side, 5 servings is probably correct.

     

    vegan mac cheese ingredients

    vegan mac and cheese 2It prepares like the Mac and Cheese of our childhood: you boil the pasta, then put butter (Earth Balance) and milk (we used Silk Cashew) and the foil packet of yellow powder. It makes for the same scary-yellow glop. When it was done, Jane dished out a small amount, undoctored. And it tasted like non-vegan, boxed, Mac and Cheese... unappealing to us, but the kids will love it.

    Then Jane did her usual thing, except the ground turkey was replaced by Yves Meatless Ground Round, threw in the cumin, and voila... comfort food.

    While this is not likely to be a product we buy often, we will definitely buy this and eat it again.
    If you're interested in trying Pastariso vegan mac & cheese for yourself, there's no need to go to your local grocer to see if they carry it, you can get it from Amazon.
    amazon-logo-300x130
    635611486222021094-Sprouts-Logo-JPG-RGB
    If there is a Sprouts supermarket near you, they carry Pastariso vegan mac & cheese. If there is a Sprouts near you, consider yourself lucky, because Sprouts is awesome.
    vegan mac and cheese sprouts
    -->

    Vega Purchased By Silk and So Delicious Conglomerate

  • Lane
  • 2 Comments
  • Wednesday, June 10, 2015
  • vega-logo






    WhiteWave, the conglomerate that owns Silk non-dairy milk products and So Delicious vegan ice cream has purchased Vega. As our regular readers known, we have written extensively about negative effects that a number of people have experienced from their vegan protein powder products. Will the change in ownership have any impact on the issues that […]

    WhiteWave, the conglomerate that owns Silk non-dairy milk products and So Delicious vegan ice cream has purchased Vega. As our regular readers known, we have written extensively about negative effects that a number of people have experienced from their vegan protein powder products.

    Will the change in ownership have any impact on the issues that people have experienced with these products? Only time will tell. Here are a couple of quotes from the press release:

    “As a pioneer in the plant-based movement, we’ve introduced Vega to a core loyal fan base and we are confident that WhiteWave will provide us with the expertise and resources to further realize our vision of empowering the world to thrive through clean, plant-based nutrition,” said Charles Chang, President and Founder of Vega. “With WhiteWave as our partner, we now collectively have our sights set on making Vega more accessible to more people.”

    Brendan Brazier, original formulator of Vega products and a former professional Ironman triathlete, said that he expects the WhiteWave acquisition will help spur more innovation. “We will continue innovating new products that simplify people’s lives and assist them in their ultimate vision of optimal health,” he said. “We are fortunate to be part of the WhiteWave family.”

    Here's the entire press release.

    Extends WhiteWave’s Plant-Based Foods & Beverages Platform Into Fast-Growing, On-Trend Plant-Based Nutrition Category

    DENVER, June 09, 2015 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The WhiteWave Foods Company (NYSE:WWAV) (“WhiteWave”), a leading consumer packaged food and beverage company in North America and Europe, today announced that it has agreed to acquire Vega, a pioneer and leader in plant-based nutrition products, for approximately US$550 million in cash.

    vega logo.jpg

    Vega offers a broad range of market-leading plant-based nutrition products – primarily powdered shakes and snack bars – containing nutrient-dense, superfood ingredients.  Vega’s products are all plant-based and provide a good source of protein, Omega 3s, fiber, vitamins, probiotics and antioxidants.  Vega holds a strong market position in the plant-based nutrition category across Canada and the U.S., with a top-tier retail customer base and loyal consumer following ranging from general wellness-seekers to athletes.  Based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Vega was founded in 2004 by President Charles Chang, and is currently majority owned by Mr. Chang and VMG Partners.

    With its distinctive product offering and opportunities to extend its line, Vega is in the early stages of its growth cycle. It is also well positioned to capitalize on the favorable plant-based eating trends and upside potential that exist in the fast-growing $8.6 billion nutritional powders, bars and ready-to-drink beverages market, where consumers are increasingly seeking healthy solutions from plant-based offerings. Moreover, this acquisition represents an opportunity for WhiteWave to extend its plant-based foods and beverages platform into nutritional powders and bars, with additional innovation opportunities.

    Vega generated net sales of approximately US$100 million over the last twelve months, representing growth of over 30% on a constant currency basis, and grew at a faster rate on a year-to-date basis in 2015. The transaction is expected to be at least $0.06 accretive to WhiteWave’s adjusted earnings per share in 2016, excluding certain transaction and other related expenses, and at least $0.09 accretive to adjusted cash earnings per share, when also excluding acquisition-related intangible amortization.  In 2015, WhiteWave expects a neutral to modest adjusted earnings per share contribution, depending on timing of transaction completion, after excluding certain transaction and other related expenses.  Vega’s growth momentum, coupled with its attractive margin profile and related financial benefits, make this a compelling investment opportunity for WhiteWave.

    “Vega’s plant-based nutrition products complement our plant-based foods and beverages portfolio. With its strong brand, high-quality products, and commitment to innovation and sustainability, Vega is a perfect fit for WhiteWave,” said Gregg Engles, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of WhiteWave. “The team has built an incredible mission-driven company, which has succeeded by consistently delivering innovative plant-based nutrition products.  This compelling, accretive transaction is consistent with our strategy to expand the scope of our business into high-growth and on-trend categories.  We are excited to welcome them to the WhiteWave family.”

    The transaction is expected to close in the third quarter of 2015, subject to regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions.  Following the close of the transaction, Vega will remain headquartered in Vancouver and its senior management team will continue to lead the business.

    “As a pioneer in the plant-based movement, we’ve introduced Vega to a core loyal fan base and we are confident that WhiteWave will provide us with the expertise and resources to further realize our vision of empowering the world to thrive through clean, plant-based nutrition,” said Charles Chang, President and Founder of Vega. “With WhiteWave as our partner, we now collectively have our sights set on making Vega more accessible to more people.”

    Brendan Brazier, original formulator of Vega products and a former professional Ironman triathlete, said that he expects the WhiteWave acquisition will help spur more innovation. “We will continue innovating new products that simplify people’s lives and assist them in their ultimate vision of optimal health,” he said. “We are fortunate to be part of the WhiteWave family.”

    WhiteWave intends to fund the acquisition under its existing $1 billion revolving credit facility.

    BofA Merrill Lynch acted as financial advisor and Haynes and Boone acted as legal advisor to WhiteWave.  Moelis & Company and Piper Jaffray & Co. acted as financial advisors and Winston & Strawn acted as legal advisor to Vega.

    ABOUT THE WHITEWAVE FOODS COMPANY

    The WhiteWave Foods Company is a leading consumer packaged food and beverage company that manufactures, markets, distributes, and sells branded plant-based foods and beverages, coffee creamers and beverages, premium dairy products and organic produce throughout North America and Europe. The Company also holds a 49% ownership interest in a joint venture that manufactures, markets, distributes, and sells branded plant-based beverages in China. WhiteWave is focused on providing consumers with innovative, great-tasting food and beverage choices that meet their increasing desires for nutritious, flavorful, convenient, and responsibly-produced products. The Company’s widely-recognized, leading brands distributed in North America include Silk® and So Delicious® plant-based foods and beverages, International Delight® and LAND O LAKES®* coffee creamers and beverages, Horizon Organic® premium dairy products and Earthbound Farm® organic salads, fruits and vegetables. Its popular plant-based foods and beverages brands in Europe include Alpro® and Provamel®, and its plant-based beverages in China are sold under the Silk ZhiPuMoFang® brand. To learn more about WhiteWave, visit www.whitewave.com.

    *The LAND O LAKES brand is owned by Land O’Lakes, Inc. and is used by license.

    ABOUT VEGA
    Vega is a pioneer and leader in the fast-growing plant-based food and nutrition category, offering a range of market-leading powder and bar products through Canada and the United States. Originally launched in Canada in 2004, Vega has become the nation’s #1 clean, plant-based nutrition brand. Good for your body and the planet, Vega is the clean, plant-based choice to fuel your healthy, active lifestyle – without compromise. For more information, please visit myvega.com, join Vega on Facebook at www.facebook.com/vegafanpage and on Twitter @VegaTeam.

    source: WhiteWave

     

    -->

    Monsanto: A Rose By Any Other Name…

  • Lane
  • Leave a comment
  • Monday, June 8, 2015
  • monsanto






    Documents released today by Syngenta include a letter from Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant to Syngenta, suggesting as a part of a corporate merger that, “We would also propose a new name for the combined company to reflect its unique global nature.” “Monsanto wants to escape its ugly history by ditching its name,” said Gary Ruskin, […]

    Documents released today by Syngenta include a letter from Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant to Syngenta, suggesting as a part of a corporate merger that, “We would also propose a new name for the combined company to reflect its unique global nature.”

    “Monsanto wants to escape its ugly history by ditching its name,” said Gary Ruskin, co-director of U.S. Right to Know, a consumer group.  “This shows how desperate Monsanto is to escape criticism: of its products, which raise environmental and health concerns, as well as concerns about corporate control of agriculture and our food system.”

    In a 2014 Harris Poll gauging the reputations of major corporations, Monsanto’s “reputation quotient” ranked 58 out of 60 companies.  In other words, it was the third most hated company measured.

    “Monsanto is much like Philip Morris when it changed its name to Altria,” Ruskin said.  “Monsanto wants us to forget about its old scandals like PCBs and Agent Orange, as well as the serious questions swirling around Roundup and GMOs.”

    U.S. Right to Know is a new nonprofit food organization that investigates and reports on what food companies don’t want us to know. In January, U.S. Right to Know released a report, titled Seedy Business, on the agrichemical and food industries’ PR campaign to defend GMOs. For more information about U.S. Right to Know, please see our website at usrtk.org.

    -->