Home Made Almond Milk

Almond Milk 7 - Finished ProductAll I can say is wow. This stuff blows away what you can buy in the store.

Jane received a Soyabella Milk Maker for Christmas this year. So far, it's been amazing. The milks you can make are far superior to what you can buy, as is often the case when you compare fresh versus packaged. The soy milk is particularly good when it's finished and still warm, but it's still soy milk which is something we haven't quite gotten the taste for. The almond milk, however, is absolutely delicious.

In our quest for a dairy-milk replacement we've tried soy milk, oat milk, hemp milk, rice milk, and almond milk. We've found that rice milk has the best taste, but the least nutritional value. Our second favorite taste has been the almond milk, so that's what we've settled on. And we were thrilled to find the home-made version is that much better.

Almond Milk 1 - Raw Almonds Almond Milk 2 - Soaking Nuts Almond Milk 3 - Components Almond Milk 4 - Assembling the Machine Almond Milk 6 - Done Almond Milk 5 - Milling

The process of making the milk is quite easy. First you soak your nuts, overnight is best. Then you drain them and affix the basket to the grinding portion of the machine. After which you add water to the carafe, drop the assembled grinder/top piece onto the carafe, press the mill button and let it rip. You actually have to hit mill button 3-5 times, once each time after each cycle is complete to get the thickness you'd like. That seems like something the manufacturer could fix, but it's a minor complaint as the mill cycle is only about 10 seconds. So it's not like you're getting all that far away from the machine anyway!

Cleanup is relatively easy, as long as you clean everything right away, or soak it in water. But you have to be careful not to get water into the sockets or the air hole in the top of the machine, which is also something I would suggest the manufacturer change in the next iteration of the machine. It makes cleanup a little more cumbersome than it would need to be.

Now for the finances: We pay $4.29 for a 16oz. bag of raw almonds at our local Trader Joe's, and $1.99 for a quart of Pacific Almond Milk (vanilla, unsweetened). We get six quarts of almond milk per bag of almonds. $4.29 / 6 servings = $0.715 per quart of home made almond milk.

The Soyabella Milk Maker costs under $100. Making almond milk at home costs about $0.72 per quart. At $1.99/quart the store bought milk is about three times as much as the homemade variety! With those parameters, the machine will pay for itself in a little over 75 quarts.

We haven’t forgotten about cow’s milk yet, but homemade almond milk is helping that along….

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Comments

  1. Jane, thanks for the tip on the egg replacer. You have such a lovely and informative blog!

  2. Glad you like it, it’s our intent to make it a resource for other vegans. Hopefully you’ll be able to find the egg replacer.

  3. Responding to your twitter message….yeah, this is the same one I got. However, it’s supposed to shut off automatically, right? My first batch stayed on for 30 minutes until I finally unplugged it, and half the volume was a thin but gritty mash that made me cough whenever I tried to drink the milk.

    I unplugged the second batch after 20 minutes, which looks much better. It says on their site that the unit should shut off and blink green when the temperature hits 181 degrees, so I fear mine is defective. =[

  4. Hi Lisa,
    Sounds like you definitely have a defective machine. We don’t have that problem when we make soy milk. Our unit shuts off. So, I’d say return it!
    The milk has a “bean-y” taste to it. There are recipes to flavor it, with sugar and vanilla and the like, but so far, we haven’t tried that.

  5. Hi,
    I have a soyabella. Mine works just fine, but if you fill the water to the fill line before you put in the top unit, it spits out the spout everywhere. So, maybe the fill line is with the top in it? But you can’t see inside when it’s on. Oh well, I’ve gotten pretty good at knowing where to put it.
    There is something you can do to make your soymilk less beany. It does depend on your beans, some soy beans are stinkier than others, but the bean taste enzyme goes away if you bring your beans to a boil before you make your milk. I also found that if I do that, I don’t need to soak them as long. You just boil them for like a minute and it might help.
    I’m looking for a good recipe for rice milk in the soyabella. I tried their recipe and ended up with a bland gelatin like mess. I thought it was gross, but my husband liked it better than my soymilk. Crazy. Anyone have anything?

  6. Hi Karen,
    We must have a different model, our fill line is actually quite low, so that doesn’t happen. Jane suggested you fill yours up with a cup measure, so you know exactly how much liquid to put in each time.
    Thanks for the tip on making the milk less beany. Our machine actually boils the water too, so I’m not sure that will work, but next time we make soy milk, Jane said she’ll try that.
    We don’t have a recipe for rice milk that we can personally recommend; Jane doesn’t care for the stuff. But the No Milk website has a bunch you might be interested in trying.

  7. Hi,
    Thanks for the almond milk info. I was a devout soy milk/soy foods
    user until I had a medical problem because of it. I recently read the
    book “The Whole Soy Story” by Kaala Daniel, PhD, CCN (no relationship
    to me) and now firmly believe NO ONE should be eating or drinking soy. Not only is it Not a health food, it is dangerous to your health. It was Never approved by the FDA to be consumed by humans. In fact it is on their poisonous plants list! The hype about the Asian’s eating large quantities for centuries: Not true. And they never drank it! When it was first used here it was in a glue to hold cardboard boxes together and scientists at the time were concerned that the soy might leak into
    the food from a cereal box into the cereal and that it would be a big
    health hazard. THAT’S how it got into production here. It never was
    approved to EAT! Please, read the book and check out the internet for
    the health risks of soy. And the OIL is the Worst and it is in everything! It is rancid before it is even bottled so they have to deodorize it. Can you say, Free Radicals? The soybean Growers have pushed this misinformation onto a believing public since the time they realized how cheap it was to grow. And they gradually figured out how to use every part of the plant so we, our pets, and farm animals are now their Trash disposals. The soy lecithin that is also in Everything was the Sludge they used to throw out after processing the beans!!
    Please read up on this. I shudder to think of all the power bars I have eaten thinking that I was doing a good thing for my body. Turns out that isolated soy proteins is one of the worst things ever INVENTED!
    And that’s the problem, they are Invented Foods made by toxic chemical extractions, high heat, and pressure. Far from a natural food and completely foreign to our bodies. I have thrown out everything in my kitchen that has any form of soy including…my almond milk! Yes, even my almond milk has soy lecithin in it! Oh and anything that says
    Natural Flavor?…that’s MSG in code, also made from soy. Manufacturers are allowed to put MSG in foods and call it other things!
    Bottom line, the FDA works for the food manufacturers Not for us and
    the food maufacturers will feed you and your children Anything that will make them money! Whew, off my soapbox now.
    Good health, Patricia

  8. I just started drinking almond milk in lieu of cow’s milk (I can’t afford raw cow’s milk and pastuerized/homogenized kills many of the health benefits, not to mention most cows milk comes from the wrong kinds of cows who are milked year round *yech, pregnancy hormones!* ) and have been blending my almonds in a blender. Must say the yield isn’t great so thanks for posting this! I think I may have discovered a new favorite appliance!

  9. I have been trying to find out which almond variety Trader Joe uses and so far no one in the company knows. I made my very first batch of homemade almond milk with there almonds several years ago, Wow, so creamy and thick.
    I decided to buy bulk and save, so now order “Truly Raw” through the California Almond growers assoc. and have tried 3 varieties and still have not come up with that first great flavor. (Also ask them and they don’t know comparisions for almond milk). I think the great taste was because the trader joe almonds are “raw pasterized” so they don’t taste raw? Don’t know…for sure. Does anyone have a almond variety suggestion that’s especially great for milk?
    Thanks all. Robbie

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